rogue no í se

Flashbacks -

Camp Creek ‘02: Tennille and the 3 kids: MJ, AMP & ZK. (Gaffney & his daughter, Kelsey, are workin’ the Wormtown booth.)

Hervieux Xmas ‘04: AMP, ZK & MJ.

Matt & Leah’s July 5th ‘12: ZK & me.

The Wormlings @ Cassidy’s bash ‘13: Way back: MJ. Back row: Jerry, ZK, Liam, AMP, Owen, Jeremiah, Anna, Meghan. Front row: Cassidy, Abby & Fiona (upside down). What a great bunch of kids!

Move-In Day UMass Amherst

Well, the eldest daughter is a college girl. Wow.

Have a great year ZK!

Love, Dad

comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN
By Andrew Wheeler
We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.
Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN

By Andrew Wheeler

We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.

Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.

READ MORE

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capncarrot:

Green Lantern and his best bud Superman, The Lego Movie

Jermaine Jones joins the NE Revolution

Jermaine Jones joins the NE Revolution

lectorconstante:

Viernes naciente. Nuestro héroe inicia la jornada con su característico y probado dinamismo.
(la pinta Yildiray Cinar)

lectorconstante:

Viernes naciente. Nuestro héroe inicia la jornada con su característico y probado dinamismo.

(la pinta Yildiray Cinar)

My home away from home awaits! Thanks girls.
CAMP CREEK 2014!

My home away from home awaits! Thanks girls.

CAMP CREEK 2014!

purple-lightsaber:

Best shirt ever? Best shirt ever.
Millennium Falcon tee on Etsy

purple-lightsaber:

Best shirt ever? Best shirt ever.

Millennium Falcon tee on Etsy

archiemcphee:

Less talk, more awesome LEGO monkey warriors!

Behold Tyler Halliwell's fantastic LEGO depiction of Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, a main character from the 16th century Chinese mythological novel Journey to the West. He possess amazing strength, speed and the ability to transform himself into a wide variety of animals and objects.

Halliwell’s LEGO sculpture features the Monkey King seated in the lotus position while wielding his trademark staff.

This is quite a large build, at 40”x15”x21” overall. I took influence from multiple Asian cultures in the design, especially with the Japanese samurai armor but with added Chinese and Korean influence.

Building the piece took about 100 hours over the course of two months and used roughly 1500 LEGO bricks.

Head over to The Brothers Brick for an interview with Tyler Halliwell about creating his mighty LEGO Monkey King.

[via The Brothers Brick]

Don’t tell me what do do.

Don’t tell me what do do.